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Research Article

Learning to Control a Brain–Machine Interface for Reaching and Grasping by Primates

  • Jose M Carmena,

    Affiliations: Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Center for Neuroengineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Mikhail A Lebedev,

    Affiliations: Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Center for Neuroengineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Roy E Crist,

    Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Joseph E O'Doherty,

    Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • David M Santucci,

    Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Dragan F Dimitrov,

    Affiliations: Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Division of Neurosurgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Parag G Patil,

    Affiliations: Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Division of Neurosurgery, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Craig S Henriquez,

    Affiliations: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Center for Neuroengineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Miguel A. L Nicolelis mail

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: nicoleli@neuro.duke.edu

    Affiliations: Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Center for Neuroengineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America

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  • Published: October 13, 2003
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0000042

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