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Research Article

Evaluation of Excess Significance Bias in Animal Studies of Neurological Diseases

  • Konstantinos K. Tsilidis equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Konstantinos K. Tsilidis, Orestis A. Panagiotou

    Affiliation: Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece

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  • Orestis A. Panagiotou equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Konstantinos K. Tsilidis, Orestis A. Panagiotou

    Affiliation: Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece

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  • Emily S. Sena,

    Affiliations: Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia

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  • Eleni Aretouli,

    Affiliations: Department of Methods and Experimental Psychology, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain, Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece

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  • Evangelos Evangelou,

    Affiliation: Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece

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  • David W. Howells,

    Affiliation: The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia

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  • Rustam Al-Shahi Salman,

    Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

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  • Malcolm R. Macleod,

    Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

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  • John P. A. Ioannidis mail

    jioannid@stanford.edu

    Affiliation: Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, and Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, and Department of Statistics, Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford, California, United States of America

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  • Published: July 16, 2013
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001609

Reader Comments (2)

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Confounding variables

Posted by SABRE on 06 Aug 2013 at 09:03 GMT

Is there any particular reason why 'temperature' was chosen from the numerous environmental factors for control as the one confounding variable to be included in the inclusion criteria?

No competing interests declared.

RE: Confounding variables

mmacleod1975 replied to SABRE on 10 Sep 2013 at 00:07 GMT

In stroke modelling, the temperature of the animal, if not regulated, will fall during the procedure. This can have protective effects which inflate the apparent effect of the drug being tested. Therefore, high quality studies will report that they took measures (usually warming the animal with a heating blanket and monitoring the temperature) to ensure it remains constant throughout the experiment.

Competing interests declared: I'm one of the authors of the original article