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Research Article

Radar Tracking and Motion-Sensitive Cameras on Flowers Reveal the Development of Pollinator Multi-Destination Routes over Large Spatial Scales

  • Mathieu Lihoreau equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Mathieu Lihoreau, Nigel E. Raine

    Affiliation: Biological and Experimental Psychology Group, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom

    Current address: School of Biological Sciences and the Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

    X
  • Nigel E. Raine equal contributor,

    equal contributor Contributed equally to this work with: Mathieu Lihoreau, Nigel E. Raine

    Affiliation: Biological and Experimental Psychology Group, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom

    Current address: School of Biological Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, United Kingdom.

    X
  • Andrew M. Reynolds,

    Affiliation: Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

    X
  • Ralph J. Stelzer,

    Affiliation: Biological and Experimental Psychology Group, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom

    X
  • Ka S. Lim,

    Affiliation: Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

    X
  • Alan D. Smith,

    Affiliation: Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

    X
  • Juliet L. Osborne,

    Affiliation: Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

    Current address: Environment & Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, United Kingdom.

    X
  • Lars Chittka mail

    l.chittka@qmul.ac.uk

    Affiliation: Biological and Experimental Psychology Group, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Published: September 20, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001392

Reader Comments (2)

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Publisher's Note: Mass of transponders

Posted by plosbiology on 11 Mar 2013 at 12:17 GMT

In the Material & Methods section, under the heading "Harmonic Radar Tracking", the published version says: "Transponders consisted of a 16 mm vertical dipole (mass 0.8 mg) that does not affect bees' flight behaviour [24]".

The correct text should be: "Transponders consisted of a 16 mm vertical dipole. The average mass of the transponder is 15mg (+/- SD=2.5mg). Because transponders are hand-made, and the amount of solder and glue cannot be precisely controlled, there is some variation in mass, so that the minimum mass is 12mg and the maximum is 20mg. It has been empirically shown that the transponders do not significantly affect bees' flight behaviour [24]."

No competing interests declared.