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Research Article

Species Interactions Alter Evolutionary Responses to a Novel Environment

  • Diane Lawrence mail,

    diane.lawrence08@imperial.ac.uk

    Affiliations: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire, United Kingdom, Grantham Institute for Climate Change, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Francesca Fiegna,

    Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire, United Kingdom

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  • Volker Behrends,

    Affiliation: Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Jacob G. Bundy,

    Affiliation: Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

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  • Albert B. Phillimore,

    Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire, United Kingdom

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  • Thomas Bell,

    Affiliations: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire, United Kingdom, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

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  • Timothy G. Barraclough

    Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire, United Kingdom

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  • Published: May 15, 2012
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001330

Reader Comments (5)

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relative frequency of each species at end of polyculture

Posted by ashley1 on 31 May 2012 at 13:31 GMT

and even faster maximum growth rates in polycultures
http://plosbiology.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001330#pbio-1001330-g002

Given than species D had a much higher growth rate by the end of polyculture than species A-C, does it follow that species D would vastly out number the others after 60 generations of exponential growth?

Is this evident in the Ne?

No competing interests declared.