Advertisement
Research Article

Mirror-Induced Behavior in the Magpie (Pica pica): Evidence of Self-Recognition

  • Helmut Prior mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: Prior@psych.uni-frankfurt.de

    Affiliation: Institut für Psychologie, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany

    X
  • Ariane Schwarz,

    Affiliation: Institut für Kognitive Neurowissenschaften, Biopsychologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum, Germany

    X
  • Onur Güntürkün

    Affiliation: Institut für Kognitive Neurowissenschaften, Biopsychologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum, Germany

    X
  • Published: August 19, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0060202

Reader Comments (3)

Post a new comment on this article

Possible additional experiment.

Posted by plosbiology on 07 May 2009 at 22:27 GMT

Author: Frank Palaia
Position: Software Engineer
Institution: Avaya
E-mail: fjpalaia@pobox.com
Submitted Date: August 19, 2008
Published Date: October 6, 2008
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

I Loved this story which I first read it in Yahoo.

I only got a chance to scan original paper though.

I was wondering;

How is the self-recogition developed?

In humans, I would assume that we spend
time looking in mirrors at an early age and
eventually attach the image to ourselves.

But animals don't spend time looking in mirrors.
They best they can do is look into a pool of water.

So, an interesting experiment would be to raise a
magpie from a baby and do not allow it to ever see its
own image, then perform the same experiment to
see if you get the same results.

No competing interests declared.