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Research Article

A Predominantly Neolithic Origin for European Paternal Lineages

  • Patricia Balaresque,

    Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom

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  • Georgina R. Bowden,

    Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom

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  • Susan M. Adams,

    Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom

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  • Ho-Yee Leung,

    Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom

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  • Turi E. King,

    Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom

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  • Zoë H. Rosser,

    Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom

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  • Jane Goodwin,

    Affiliation: Ty Celyn, Maeshafod, Blaina, Gwent, United Kingdom

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  • Jean-Paul Moisan,

    Affiliation: Laboratoire d'Etude du Polymorphisme de l'ADN, Faculté de Médecine, Nantes, France

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  • Christelle Richard,

    Affiliation: Laboratoire d'Etude du Polymorphisme de l'ADN, Faculté de Médecine, Nantes, France

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  • Ann Millward,

    Affiliation: Molecular Medicine Research Group, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, Plymouth, United Kingdom

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  • Andrew G. Demaine,

    Affiliation: Molecular Medicine Research Group, Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, Plymouth, United Kingdom

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  • Guido Barbujani,

    Affiliation: Dipartimento di Biologia ed Evoluzione, Università di Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy

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  • Carlo Previderè,

    Affiliation: Dipartimento di Medicina Legale e Sanità Pubblica, Università di Pavia, Pavia, Italy

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  • Ian J. Wilson,

    Affiliation: Institute of Human Genetics, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

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  • Chris Tyler-Smith,

    Affiliation: The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, United Kingdom

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  • Mark A. Jobling mail

    maj4@le.ac.uk

    Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom

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  • Published: January 19, 2010
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000285

Reader Comments (3)

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Origin Point or Destination?

Posted by JK2010 on 21 Jan 2010 at 09:31 GMT

What this study shows is that the focus of diversity of R1b1b2 is the Aegean coast of westernmost Anatolia. The authors make no direct connection of this location to the origin(s) of agriculture further east and south other than the vaguely worded formula "Near East via Anatolia".

Having identified the focus of R1b1b2 diversity as western Anatolia, the history of this area becomes essential. It is well known to have been a densely-populated, cosmopolitan region in ancient historical times, largely inhabited by a series of invading Indo-European peoples from the Bronze Age through Roman Empire. Slavs in-migrated in Byzantine times, and the Ottoman Janissary system of importing child soldiers from the Balkans continued into the modern era. This gives a great potential for the diversity of R1b1b2 variants that the authors' data claims for this area, to be the result of a re-concentration of variants present at low levels among each of the different incoming Indo-European peoples.

No competing interests declared.

RE: Origin Point or Destination?

scimom replied to JK2010 on 29 Jan 2010 at 04:22 GMT

I would love to know the author's response to this. Could further support be gained through testing ancient DNA?

No competing interests declared.