Advertisement
Research Article

How Many Species Are There on Earth and in the Ocean?

  • Camilo Mora mail,

    moracamilo@hotmail.com

    Affiliations: Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, Department of Geography, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States of America

    X
  • Derek P. Tittensor,

    Affiliations: Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Microsoft Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom

    X
  • Sina Adl,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

    X
  • Alastair G. B. Simpson,

    Affiliation: Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

    X
  • Boris Worm

    Affiliation: Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

    X
  • Published: August 23, 2011
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001127
  • Featured in PLOS Collections

Reader Comments (9)

Post a new comment on this article

Reinventing Willis?

Posted by piklprado on 04 Sep 2011 at 16:49 GMT

It is perplexing that the classic work of J.C. Willis (Age and area, 1922) is not cited. Many of the ideas of these paper can be easily traced back to this source.

By the way, "reinventing Willis" is not my idea: it is the title of an article by M.V. Simkin and V.P. Roychowdhury (http://arxiv.org/abs/phys...) about how researchers that do not read the classics are doomed to ' "re-invent things that were long known" '. The repeated re-discovery of Willis-Yule process is one of their case studies.

No competing interests declared.