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Research Article

A Global Assessment of Salmon Aquaculture Impacts on Wild Salmonids

  • Jennifer S Ford mail,

    To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: jenford@ecologyaction.ca

    Affiliation: Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

    X
  • Ransom A Myers †

    † Deceased.

    Affiliation: Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

    X
  • Published: February 12, 2008
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0060033
  • Featured in PLOS Collections

Reader Comments (2)

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Res Ipsa Loquitur

Posted by plosbiology on 07 May 2009 at 22:23 GMT

Author: Owen Myers
Position: Lawyer
Institution: St. John's, Nfld.
E-mail: southernauk@yahoo.com
Submitted Date: March 15, 2008
Published Date: March 21, 2008
This comment was originally posted as a “Reader Response” on the publication date indicated above. All Reader Responses are now available as comments.

Anadromous fish like salmon and trout use olfactory stimuli as a guidance mechanism. It is obvious that putting millions of salmonids in cages on their migration route is going to cause problems to their migrations. This is especially the case when cages are located at migratory bottle necks where they must be encountered by both outgoing smolt and returning adults.

Competing interests declared: No competing interests to declare.